Resume & Interview Tips

Resume Tips

Demonstrate your qualifications effectively with help from Management Recruiters - Mid Hudson Valley. As part of our candidate services, we offer resume tips, interview advice, and other assistance to help you put your best face forward.

Can't think of anything to write down about what you do in your job? Answer some of these questions. We guarantee that you will come up with some new ideas about your job responsibilities and skills.

  • What experience, skills, aptitudes, or traits do you have that could be of some use to some employer?
  • What skills have you developed, at least to some degree, that you have never used at work?
  • Do others at work or elsewhere come to you for any particular kind of help?
  • Do you have military experience? Provide details such as branch, grade, specialty, discharge status, duties, accomplishments, medals, citations, or commendations. Did you receive promotions ahead of schedule?
  • Have you ever published an article, report, or anything else—even as a volunteer? How about a company or professional association newsletter?
  • Have you ever given a talk, speech, or presentation, or provided training to anyone at work or elsewhere?
  • What digital platforms or operating systems do you use? List your computer literacy skills, including any software, programs, internet skills, etc.
  • What foreign languages do you know, and what is your level of skill in each?
  • Do you have any special travel experience, domestic or foreign? If you studied, lived, or worked in a foreign country, how long were you there?


  • How many people did you supervise? Orient? Hire? Train?
  • How large of a budget did you manage?
  • Who do you report to?
  • What was the highest level in the company that you reported to or communicated with directly?
  • Did you coordinate anything?
  • Serve as liaison between groups or key individuals?
  • Mediate between groups or individuals?
  • Resolve any conflicts?
  • Serve as mentor to anyone?
  • Did you handle, or participate in, strategic planning?
  • Did you set, evaluate, or participate in the setting or evaluation of policy?
  • Did you evaluate any individual or group performance or any task or project research?
  • How did you relate to the product or service?
  • Did you communicate with customers? How?
  • Were you on any proposal teams, in-house or with a customer or subcontractor? Did the proposal succeed?
  • What was your function on the team, or your contribution to winning? Your team's percentage of wins?
  • Did you communicate with suppliers or subcontractors? How?
  • Did you purchase services or supplies for the office, unit, or department?
  • Ever serve as a troubleshooter? In what area?
  • Did you back up someone? Who?
  • Did you do any surveys or other research or studies? Determine requirements?
  • Prepare recommendations?
  • Design or manage any processes, systems, or projects?
  • Organize any events, conferences, meetings? How many?
  • Did you administer anything?
  • Consult for anyone, inside or outside the organization?
  • Did you gain experience in any special use software? Analytical or evaluative procedures? Equipment or hardware?
  • What kind of writing did you do, for yourself or someone else? What did you write about?
  • Did you write any that was delivered to a customer as a product, or part of one?
  • How much reduction in costs or increase in profits did you contribute to?
  • Did you add any smoothness, quality, or economy of operation that noticeably improved the way things were before you assumed responsibility?
  • Any concrete or specific signs of the gain you achieved?
  • Did you propose, suggest, or initiate any programs, changes, or improvements that were implemented at least partly because of your initiative?
  • What positive results occurred?
  • What did you do as a volunteer, beyond the regular duties of your position?
  • Whether you were paid for it or not, what were you particularly good at that made a difference in how the office (job, project, assignment) progressed from day to day?


  • Were you praised, recognized, or given a pat on the back for anything—a particular assignment, a method of working, a trait of character? How? By whom?
  • Were you promoted ahead of schedule?
  • Selected for any special responsibilities or programs?

Interview Tips

90% of hires are based solely upon the interview, according to a Harvard Business Review study. In fact, 63% of hiring decisions are made within the first 4.3 minutes of an interview (courtesy SHRM.) The interview is probably the most important part of the hiring process. That's why you need to spend time with your Search Consultant to better understand whom you are interviewing with and the issues that you will be talking about during the interview.

You always need to "take temperatures" because people have minds and they're changing them constantly. You need to listen to what they don't say. Being prepared for an interview is vital. The following preparation is very unique and effective in conducting a positive interview.

Things to Remember

  • People have to buy you before they buy from you.
  • People hire and accept emotionally first and justify logically later.
  • People are most sold by your conviction rather than by your persuasion.
  • Know your technology, but think PEOPLE.
  • The decision to hire is made in the first 5 to 10 minutes of the interview, with the remaining time spent justifying that decision.

Candidate Preparation

Please take these notes to the interview and practice the anticipated questions that may be asked and your answers to those questions. Be sure to practice these steps out loud to yourself before the interview.

  • “What are the duties and responsibilities of the position I'm applying for?” This is an excellent icebreaker question for the hiring authority and a great start to a successful interview. “What percentage of my job is dedicated to administration, supervisory, and technical?”
  • “What is my number one priority that has to be done before I leave each day? Why?”
  • “What are the production or sales goals? What obstacles would prevent me from reaching my goals?”
  • “What are the short and long term goals set for the person in this position?”
  • Have questions for the hiring authority. Questions must be written out before the interview, while avoiding the topic of compensation and benefits for the first interview.

After you leave the interview, it is very important that you call us immediately!

Contact our recruitment firm for more resume tips and other crucial advice. We are proud to serve employers and candidates nationwide.